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Birdman^i^ The Bird's The Word!

Birdman^i^ started this conversation

May today there be peace within. May you trust that you are exactly where you are meant to be. May you not forget the infinite possibilities that are born of faith in yourself and others. May you use the gifts that you have received, and pass on the love that has been given to you. May you be content with yourself just the way you are. Let this knowledge settle into your bones, and allow your soul the freedom to sing, dance, praise and love. It is there for each and every one of us

Founder-Alaska Fisher-men Fisher-women Organizing Resource Development-AFFORD INC.2009 

Bristol Bay  1942                 July 13, 2008

Department of Fish and Game Juneau, AK 99811-5526

RE: 2008 Processing Limitations in Bristol Bay

Dear Commissioner Lloyd:

We have been contacted by many angry constituents in an uproar about how commercial fishermen in Bristol Bay were once again “put on limits” by processors during the height of the 2008 salmon season and for the second consecutive year, forced to forego millions of dollars of lost revenue.

As in 2007 and in previous years, this took place after the State was assured earlier in the year by processors that sufficient processing capacity would be in place to handle the forecasted harvest for the upcoming season.

Without debating the merits of the “2008 Bristol Bay Sockeye Salmon Processing Capacity Survey” and the changes that were administered in the survey methodology, it is clear that the pattern of promises -- made by processors during the winter but not fulfilled during the summer season -- continues to plague the fishery and cost local fishermen greatly in terms of their economic livelihood.

As a measure of the significance of the issue, we are writing at this time to ask for your department’s response to the 2008 season and for the development of a plan to address the problem of inadequate processing capacity in the Bristol Bay fishery.

Sincerely,

Senator Lyman Hoffman Rep. Bryce Edgmon

Senate District M House District 37

Elder's Meditation of the Day -
".the Creator was responsible for the existence of everything, a part of the Creator's spirit exists in everything and thus all things are connected."
--Larry P. Aitken, CHIPPEWA
The Creator designed nature, people, and all things as an interconnected system. Everything is connected to each other. This connection exists in the Unseen World. The same way our body parts are all port of the body-the parts are separate but also connected. If a part of our body is in pain, the rest of the body recognizes this pain as its own. In other words, the pain of one is the pain of all. This is also true of every interconnected system. Because we are connected, we should respect and take care of our Earth and each other.

Great Spirit, let me treat everyone, today, as if they were You.

                       AFFORD INC.                                                                WE 

 Executive Summary

Bristol Bay is one of the most productive marine ecosystems in the world, home to thelargest wild sockeye salmon runs in the world. The rivers and creeks of Bristol Bay provide pristine spawning grounds for five species of Pacific Salmon: Chinook or King(Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Coho or Silver (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Sockeye or Red(Oncorhynchus nerka), Chum (Oncorhynchus keta), and Pink (Onchorhynchus gorbuscha).

The freshwater lakes in this region offer abundant habitat for Rainbow Trout (Onchorynchus Mykiss), Arctic Char (Salvelinus alpinus), Arctic Grayling (Thymallus arcticus), and Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma Walbaum) and support critical salmon spawning streams and rivers. The largest herring fishery in Alaska spawns on the north shore of Bristol Bay, near Togiak.

The Bristol Bay commercial fisheries management area includes eight major river systems: Naknek, Kvichak, Egegig, Ugashik, Wood, Nushagak, Igushik, and
Togiak. Collectively, these rivers support the LARGEST COMMERCIAL SOCKEYE SALMON FISHERY in the world. The Kvichak River is home to the single LARGEST SALMON RUN on the planet.

The Nushagak River hosts the LARGEST KING RUN in Alaska. Annual commercial catches between 1984 and 2003 averaged nearly 24 million sockeye salmon, 69,000 Chinook, 971,000 Chum, 133,000 Coho, and 593,000. In 2007, the Bristol Bay sockeye salmon run approximately 44.3 million fish and the preliminary catch report of 29.5 million sockeye rank 9th and 8th, respectively, since statehood. Year after year, the fish keep coming back in astounding numbers; this fishery proves to be well managed. On average, individuals in Bristol Bay communities harvest (subsistence) 2.4 million points of salmon per year, or 315 pounds per person, as their main source of food.

The 2008 Bristol Bay sockeye salmon forecast and harvest projection are provided below.

FORECAST AREA: Bristol Bay

SPECIES: Sockeye Salmon (OUR BREAD & BUTTER)

FORECAST OF THE 2008 RUN:

Forecast Forecast Range

TOTAL PRODUCTION: (millions) (millions)

Total Run 40.3 29.9–50.6

Escapement Levels 8.9

The forecast for the sockeye salmon run to Bristol Bay in 2008 is the sum of individual predictions for nine river systems (Kvichak, Alagnak, Naknek, Egegik, Ugashik, Wood, Igushik, Nushagak-Mulchatna, and Togiak) and four age classes (ages 1.2, 1.3, 2.2, and 2.3, plus ages 0.3 and 1.4 for Nushagak River). Adult escapement and return data from brood years 1976–2004 were used in the analyses.

 

                AFFORD INC.                                                                                                             . Love                                  

RESULTS A total of 40.3 million sockeye salmon are expected to return to Bristol Bay in 2008. This prediction is18% higher than the previous 10-year mean of total runs (30.3 million; range of 17.8 million to 46.0 million). The 80% confidence bounds for the 2007 forecasted run ranged from 29.9 million to 50.6 million. All systems are expected to exceed their minimum spawning escapement goals. A run of 40.3 million sockeye salmon can potentially produce a total harvest of 31.4 million fish if escapement goals are met for managed stocks and industry is capable of taking the surplus fish. A harvest of this size would be 53% higher than the previous 10-year mean harvest (20.4 million; range was 9.9 million to 29.4 million). ADF&G anticipated the actual harvest was be between 25 million and 29 million sockeye salmon based on actual harvests from recent runs of similar size.

Thenforecasted run to each district and river system is as follows: 14.65 million to Naknek-Kvichak District (3.56 million to Kvichak River; 3.32 million to Alagnak River; 7.78 million to Naknek River); 8.02 million to Egegik District; 6.48 million to Ugashik District; 10.41 million to Nushagak District(7.10 million to Wood River; 1.93 million to Nushagak River; 1.37 million to Igushik River) and 0.74 million to Togiak District. The forecasted total run of 40.3 million sockeye salmon is expected to be comprised of 19.80 million age 1.3 fish (49%) followed by 13.33 million age 1.2 fish (33%), 3.47 million age 2.2 fish (9%), 3.50 million age 2.3 fish (9%), 0.004 million age 0.3 (<1%) and 0.178 million age 1.4 fish (>1%).

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game's preliminary estimates for the 2008 commercial salmon harvest show the 16th largest harvest since Alaska became a state 49 years ago. The estimates are preliminary and revised estimates will be produced in 2009, after all fish ticket data have been finalized, and processors have submitted their annual reports, which include the final prices paid for salmon in 2008.

Commercial fishermen harvested 146 million salmon in 2008. The 2008 harvest was 67 million fish less than the 2007 harvest of 213 million fish, 13.5 million fish above the preseason forecast of 132.5 million fish, and 27.3 million fish below the most recent 10 year average (2007-1998) commercial harvest of 173 million salmon.

At $409.3 million, the value of the 2008 catch is higher than the most recent 10 year average (2007-1998) of $289 million, and only $7.4 million less than fishermen earned in 2007, marking the second consecutive year since 1995 that the total value has exceeded $400 million.

Preliminary 2008 prices are showing increased value for Chinook, coho, pink, and chum salmon compared to the final 2007 prices. Only the preliminary sockeye salmon price in2008 is slightly below that for 2007.

Chinook salmon prices increased from $3.07 per pound in 2007 to $4.28 per pound in 2008, while coho salmon prices increased from $0.96 per pound in 2007 to $1.21 per pound in 2008. Chum salmon prices increased from $0.34 cents per pound in 2007 to $0.53 cents per pound in 2008, and pink salmon prices were up by $0.10 cents per pound at $0.29 in 2008.

                 AFFORD INC.                                                                                                                                  YOU!

   RED SALMON THIS WAY...                 

 The preliminary statewide average price for sockeye salmon is $.78 per pound, 2 cents less than last year. Final 2008 prices for all salmon species may be higher after any post-season adjustments and end-of-season bonuses are paid to fisherman.

Bristol Bay's sockeye salmon harvest of 27.7 million fish was the 11th largest since 1893. The ex-vessel (fisherman) value of $111.3 million was slightly lower than the 2007 Bristol Bay value of $115.7 million. The preliminary average price paid for sockeye salmon in Bristol Bay was 1 cent per pound less than it was in 2007. The statewide pink salmon harvest of 84 million fish is well below the all time record-setting harvest of 161 million fish in 2005 and the most recent 30 year historical average (1978-2007) of 91.1 million fish.

The statewide chum salmon harvest of 18.2 million fish ranks as the seventh best of all time in numbers of fish and the ex-vessel value of $78.8 million captures the second highest ranking since statehood.

AFFORD INC.'s (Company) goal is to develop step by step micro-fish processing capability (Co-operatives) in disadvantaged communities throughout western Alaska coastal fishing communities, to regain resource control into local hands (self determination) while working to keep a fair market price share from going outside Alaska. As the Company is located in the SW community of Togiak, we show Bristol Bay but our goal extends around key fishing communities in western Alaska CDQ (community development quota program) comprised of depressed Alaska Native Village Communities under The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of December 18, 1971.

As First People(s) of Alaska the Native population maintain it's communities with a subsistence lifestyle. This lifestyle has traditionally conflicted with commercial operations as community members felt they had to choose between doing one or the other to survive. Under our opportunity they can now do both at the same time as part of the fish harvested for processing can go directly into their freezers or drying/smoking process giving a balanced labor force to build the community.

                             AFFORD INC.

Peace

ALWAYS KEEP IT CLEAN = COMMUNITY SUCCESS!!!...Birdman^i^

Are You Following Me?

Elders Meditation of the Day -
"There's a deep wound in people-that they have been so cut off from the source of their being, their mother, their Earth Mother."
--Francis Story Talbott II (Medicine Story), WAMPANOAG
When we are connected to the Earth Mother, or when we are clear on our purpose, we will feel connected and safe. We will feel love. When we are disconnected from the Earth Mother, or we don't know who we are or why we are, we will feel pain. It will be similar to a little child who has lost its Mother. We will hurt inside-we will be wounded within. If this happens to the whole community, the people will be very sad and lost. It will seem like there is death in the air. When this happens, it is time for ceremony and reconnection to God and Mother Earth. This is the time of prayer.

Great Mystery, today, help me to stay connected to the Earth and to You, my Creator.

AFFORD INC.
Alaska Fisher-men Fisher-women Organizing Resource Development
Love Is The CornerStone Holding All Joy^i^
A Man With Wings Is Truly An Angel^i^
Blessings Of Love...Birdman^ i^
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/suijuriscourtangels/
What kind of a legal system is this where we're going to design our rules to encourage guilty people to plead - or innocent people to plead guilty? It's crazy. Justice Scalia        
  "…risks must be taken, because the greatest risk in life is to risk nothing.  The person who risks nothing, does nothing, has nothing, is nothing, and becomes nothing.  He may avoid suffering and    sorrow, but he simply cannot learn and feel and change and row and love and live.  Chained by his   certitudes, he's a slave.  He's forfeited his freedom.  Only the person who risks is truly free."        
If A Silver Salmon Can Make Mary Jane Wilcox Happy... Think How She'd Feel If Given Fare Price For Her Hard Work, Dedication and Investment!!!...Birdman^i^

                        

                                  Let's All Work Together!!!

                                                                  

GOVERNOR SARAH PALIN                                                                                       Kevin Francis, Ramey

Alaska State Capitol Building                                                                                      Togiak, AK 99678

Juneau, AK 99811-0001           

Commissioner Denby Lloyd                                                                                           Sunday July 20, 2008

Department of Fish and Game

Juneau, AK 99811-5526

RE: Loss of down fishing time and resources

Dear Governor Palin and Commissioner Lloyd;

I would like to place an important option to your immediate attention, regarding our fishing and fishing community’s futures. We all agree these two are in distress from management decisions of the past and in my humble opinion, it is time to re-engineer a better promise for a brighter future. We should never think we are subject to foreign processing in order to achieve high goals for Alaska and All Alaskans.

I would like to see Alaska’s Western CDQ communities take the lead to band together to organize Village based processes unique to an individual community. For example, picture portable containers, that house a particular process and can be ready shipped and assemble, as a community requires. The corner stone would be in fisherman’s handling such as H&G bleed fish on board, chilled and delivered to filleting and packaging operations ready to expedite from the water to the dinner tables in as short of time as possible to insure consumer quality. We have drafted plans to such operations for your review. As filleting is grasped and a new process such as commercial smoking or canning is needed, the operation container can be barged in to snap onto an established and working process.

Some believe we need to construct multi-million dollar operations that require much investment all at once. This is not the case if we look towards the future and micro manage our movements to develop success stories around Western Alaska where much needed economic development is surly needed. I could really talk long and hard on this area as Togiak with it’s monopolized fish processors that pay 50 cents a pound for fish that grabs a much higher value as it journeys outward to the benefit of other states citizenry and a huge loss for Alaskans.

The answer isn’t found in foreign processors but in the hearts of all Alaskans who want and deserve a better future. I say let’s work together to make it happen as we re-tool our thinking and perspective to micro processing in Western Alaska. These processing stations would insure less shut down and loss of valuable fishing time as well as convert profit processes to build economic stability in Western Alaska’s poorest communities. The dinosaurs of the past must be streamlined into processes that can be added for resource development for of local customary process marketable into many areas and uses. For example, human or pet consumption as well as fish oil markets for Omega III in vitamin markets etc.

Okay, I believe we have all worked and thought on these things but I would like to see sleeves roll up and minds come together to solve and build better solutions. We shouldn’t have the problems in the fishing/processing industry in Alaska we have today with loss of fishing time with a result of economic loss in Alaska’s communities. Let’s hold a CDQ Communities Fishing/Processing Summit to put ideas into action for better seasons to come. Let’s not look to outside help and resources to develop what belongs to Alaskans. Let’s work to set the pace and establish a fair market price for Alaskan’s and Alaskan resources. I have seen the markets and have much respect for micro processing in Alaska, please help others and me realize a dream unique to Western Alaskans.

Thank you for your time and thoughts in this matter. As I will be out fishing tomorrow, I will e-mail this proposal letter with a hard copy to follow for your records.

Best Wishes,

Kevin Francis, Ramey, Fisherman and Togiak City Council Member

C.C.: Senator Lyman Hoffman

Rep. Bryce Edgmon

Robin Samuelsen, Jr., CEO & President BBEDC (CDQ program Corp.)

Fritz Johnson, Regional Fisheries Crdntr.

Moses Kritz, Rep. Togiak BBEDC

 

Elders Meditation of the Day -
"Everything's so simple, and we make everything so complicated. That's why we're confused."
--Vickie Downey, TEWA/Tesuque Pueblo
The Creator designed a very simple set of Laws for us to follow. If we follow these simple things, we'll be happy. If we don't follow these simple things, our lives become complicated. For example:
    Respect Mother Earth
    Love one another
    Be truthful
    Give to your brother and sisters
    Be gentle with each other
    Be happy
Following these simple Laws will have great rewards.

Great Spirit, let me lead a simple life.

AFFORD INC  

ADF&G Releases Results of 2009 Bristol Bay Sockeye Salmon Processing Capacity Survey

(JUNEAU) - The Alaska Department of Fish and Game’s (ADF&G) preseason survey of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon processing capacity is now available on the internet.  Capacity is defined as a combination of the physical processing capacity and the intent of buyers and processors to use that capacity to purchase and process salmon.

Fifteen processors were selected to participate in the survey.  These processors include the largest salmon processors in Bristol Bay.  Collectively these companies purchased 97.9% of the sockeye salmon harvested in Bristol Bay in 2008.

For 2009, the combined processing capacity reported in the survey totals 1.8 million sockeye salmon per day; with a capacity over the entire season of 30.7 million sockeye salmon.  Several processors indicated they would have a “long haul” fleet and provided information on the capacity of that fleet.  Processors purchasing sockeye salmon in Bristol Bay indicated the number of tenders they plan to employ and the number of fish being purchased in 2009 will increase compared to the 2008 season.

The 2009 ADF&G point forecast for Bristol Bay is for a harvest of 23.9 million sockeye salmon.  The conclusion from comparing the processing capacity survey results with the ADF&G sockeye salmon forecast for 2009 indicates that there will be adequate processing capacity to utilize the number of sockeye salmon expected to be harvested in 2009.  However, depending on run timing, it is still possible that daily harvesting capacity could exceed processing capacity.

The survey also asked if processors intended to buy salmon from the Ugashik District in 2009, and if so, if they intended to buy more sockeye salmon from that district than they had in 2008.  Nine companies indicated they intend to purchase sockeye salmon in the Ugashik District in 2009, and they expect to increase their purchases of sockeye salmon in 2009 above the amounts they purchased in 2008.

                                                

AFFORD INC.          Why?  Because YOU Can't AFFORD Not Too!!!

Togiak & Twin Hills

Clean Pristine Waters Make Wild Caught Alaska Salmon Number One & Healthy!

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Cherokeeladyaz

This is sounding better all the time for the villagers if i am reading it correctly... Wish i could buy a few ton, but navajo dont eat fish since they afre inland indians  and my freezer is not that large!!!!

Gooo Birdman!!!!!!!!!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^ Keep Flying!!

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